Learn to Love the List

What do you do when you have a million things to do and no time to do it?

Well, I make time to sharpen my pencil (which is mechanical so it doesn’t take long) and make a checklist.

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Once I write my tasks down I can breathe easier.

Yes, I’m the high-strung, hyper-organized workaholic that can’t get enough of checklists.

*You people who simply ‘enjoy the ride’ are always in my way!
Seriously, 35 in a 60? I have places to be!!*

I make checklists every single day.

In my neatly organized planner:

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In my writer’s notebook:

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After rereading my notebook this week I noticed that checklists are a major theme in my writing.

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In other blog posts:

http://graphicnovelseng431.wordpress.com/2013/07/16/inferences-and-checklists/

Even checklists in your dental practice? Sure, why not.

What brings me back to the checklist? There is no other feeling in the entire world like checking an item off of your checklist.

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SO WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH ENGLISH METHODS?

Well nothing.

But it does relate to two articles I just read for English Methods.

First, NCTE published a piece on Adolescent Literacy that is full of tangible bullet-points that can directly apply to classrooms.

The article busts myths about adolescent literacy, lists several school programs to improve literacy, and acknowledges various ways to promote literacy with a simple infographic.

The second article is a new approach to learning called Connected Learning Principles that is designed to meet the standards AND address the digital world of learning.

This article also breaks down the connected learning into three main points: Learning Principles, Design Principles, and Core Values in education.

Now if you’ll excuse me I have to cross off checklists blog from my checklist.

checklists

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